Loved by Lou – My Make-Up Evolution

I think it’s safe to say that most girls love make-up and the effects it can have. However, there is difference between loving makeup and knowing the techniques to master it. I remember writing my CV when I was applying for my internship; I said I had a great passion for make-up but, looking back, I really didn’t have a clue what I was doing.

At school art was my favourite subject, and as I’m heading into a new year working in make-up I start to realise how make-up is a form of art. It is probably even more important as this is a piece of art you have to showcase on your face. Today, I am going to talk about some new tricks I’ve learnt using make-up, and how different shades, materials and tools are all important factors in the end result.
Primers really do make such a difference. They set the skin and create a base for you to begin your make-up. I always used to find that sometimes my make-up would end up looking patchy by the end of the day. By putting on a primer beforehand, this allows your make-up to set more evenly. The question is – which one, Matt or Satin? It’s great that thanks to cosmetic technology we can can have dewy cheeks without an oily forehead.
Before I worked at Illamasqua, I used to think that brushes were just a company’s way of making more money. Why use them when you can just use your fingers to blend? Well, I’m pretty sure Leonardo da Vinci didn’t paint the Mona Lisa with his fingers, (not that I’m comparing myself to the Mona Lisa)! Not to mention travelling into London every day – I dread to think of the terrible bacteria lurking on my hands. I used to use a Foundation Brush until I switched to a Highlighter Brush; I found this gave a more airbrushed and lighter effect rather than a full coverage. It gives your complexion a softer look but still leaves a lovely coverage.
I used to just sweep any old bronzer across my cheekbones and be done with it. Now, I’ve learnt that you can use darker and lighter shades to contour and highlight, creating a whole new dimension to your face. I was amazed by the little tricks I have been taught. Now when I take my bronzer, instead of drawing two sharp lines, I blend it into a three on each side of my face. Along the jaw line, up, then across the cheekbone and up again to the forehead. This accentuates lines and creates definition. One of my favourite tricks is to make the illusion of a smaller nose by placing a darker colour along the sides of your nose and a lighter colour down the bridge, creating an instant nose-job! Without fail now I always put a lighter colour underneath my eyebrows to really make them pop out. (If you read my last post you will know how much I love a defined brow!)
A few months ago I attended the ‘Night Time Diva Course’. I had a brilliant time and learnt so much, and I was finally taught step-by-step how to do a smokey eye. Whenever I used to try and perfect a smokey eye, I always found that eyeshadows would fall down my face and I would end up looking like a panda bear. Even after you try and take away the fallen product, you find yourself taking away half your foundation. Starting your smokey eye first eliminates this risk; you can be as messy as you want and then apply your foundation around the eye.
I’ve recently switched from using a pencil to shadows on my brows and it has made such a difference! Hair, especially on your face, should be soft. Instead of harsh, blocked lines you should blend and sweep to create an effortless look. I LOVE structured brows and used to think that the only way to create a whole new shape was to draw a new one on. Then, I was introduced to our Angled Brush, I found that the precise bristles allow you to draw on a new shape without the wet, chalky affect I find some pencils can leave. You should also position your eyebrows in three points, check out the picture below of the high-points your brows should start and finish at.
Hope you can take away with you some useful tips in doing your make-up and I’d love to hear your own tips and tricks? 


Govinder Rayt

Govinder Rayt

Writer and expert